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  #11  
Unread 08-11-2008, 06:51 PM
kc_beck kc_beck is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Spokane, WA
I say dump the sticker. The reflector is a major improvement, plus having the plate mounted low like that just looks right.
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  #12  
Unread 08-17-2008, 10:28 AM
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ExitWound ExitWound is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Pennsylvania
Front Brake Calipers Rebuilt


I took some time to rebuild the brake calipers on the car today. This was as easy as doing the backs, easier even due to our previous engagement with the rears. It took a few hours. The weather was gorgeous and I had good help.



The caliper is a floating frame, single piston design.

I spent the day tearing apart the brakes and here's what I found on the driver's side:





As you can see in the first picture, the piston itself is *covered* in grime, dirt, and solid particles. The rubber boot surrounding the piston has ripped. The dirt in the chamber was solid, thick, and gritty.

When doing a brake rebuild, the boot, a locking ring, and a rubber ring inside the piston need to be replaced. These rebuild kits can be found at Pelican Parts for about $12 per wheel.

The passenger side wheel was easier to manage and took far less time. The chamber and piston were just as bad though:



The boot had broken on this side as well, and dirt and grime filled the chamber.

At this point, the car has new pads all around and newly rebuilt pistons. The only things that haven't been replaced are the rotors, and they look good.
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  #13  
Unread 09-22-2008, 06:54 PM
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ExitWound ExitWound is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Pennsylvania
I've done a few small things to the car in the past few weeks. With my latest round of purchases, I got me a free limited edition Porsche mug!


It's number 3007 of 5000 in the Porsche #1 run. The mug and insert describes the first Porsche to hit market and how they've changed in the fifty years of the company. Pretty cool!

License Plate Frame

I managed to get the license plate frame mounted and lit. Mounting it was a pain enough. If you remember back to when I was installing the front license plate frame, mounting any sort of license plate on the car is a daunting task. Not only is the mounting hardware complicated, but it's inaccessible. The rear plate mounting between the tail lights isn't too bad. However, the mount on the lower bumper is a little more of a challenge.

I had installed the new centre reflector badge which ultimately caused my license plate to move to the bumper. In Pennsylvania, and pretty much every other state, the license plate *must* be lit (and visible) at night to pass inspection. Any car without a lit plate can be pulled over without question. I needed to buy a license plate light of some sort, or relocate the ones I have on the car already. This is what I settled on.


It was a hefty $49, but it looks stunning. The frame itself is built of metal, chromed black (I had the choice of silver). No other models I found were a one-piece design, fit the full car license plate (most were motorcycle sized), and came with the mounting hardware as well. It was as easy as splicing into the parking light wiring, so the instructions said.

Turns out that it wasn't. When spliced into the wiring, I was blowing the fuse 38, *instrument cluster*, which also handled the parking lights. It was wired on a 5A fuse. Each LED, and there are nine on the frame, draw very little power, roughly .02A each. Why was it blowing the 5A fuse? I connected it directly to the car battery and the frame lit up beautifully. Back to the circuit and it wasn't working.

Two things. One of the wires on the parking circuit that was exposed was a power line. Apparently, the former owner must have had a similar rear reflector that was lit up and had it powered on this circuit. However, that exposed power wire apparently was no longer powered by anything, hence the dead circuit. Secondly, there were no indications on the frame about how much power is actually does drain. Obviously, much more than the .18A estimated. I upped the fuse 38 from 5A to 7.5A and it lights gorgeously at night.

Stereo Reinstalled

I fooled around with the stereo today to see what I could do with it. If you recall, the CD Player function stopped working when it was installed on the VW and was acting really funny in the 944. When the car was on, it couldn't read the disc. And I don't believe it was due to the vibration of the player. CD3 errors (unable to read) every time. Then, in the winter, the radio function was acting up too. It would power on as if it was working, but there was no output. I've had it disconnected for some time now.


Rewired it and the radio is working now. CD playing is working as well, but I didn't try with the car on. Will know tomorrow.

Parts Ordered

I took out a loan and bought the left and right side hood insulation pads. The paint and clearcoat on the hood are getting terrible. Every day, more and more flakes off. There's probably no stopping it at this point, but having the insulation will keep much of the heat away at least. Until I get it painted, it's a preventative measure.

I also managed to spend $21 on a new Temperature Sensor. I don't have the ability to test the one in the engine right now. A new one at this price is better than attempting to fix the old one. This sensor senses the operating temperature of the engine and either runs the car rich or lean, depending on the reading. This *might* be the cause of the inability to start the car when warm. I hope, anyway. I'm running out of ideas on this one.
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  #14  
Unread 09-25-2008, 09:18 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Pennsylvania
Installation of the DME Temp Sensor

I took the afternoon to do a simple swap, the DME Sensor. The sensor was roughly $20 and is an easy installation.


To install the sensor, the air intake has to come off. Finally, it's an update that doesn't include taking off the intake header though. Just the air. Removing the J-boot exposes the sensor quite easily and it's only a 19mm wrench standing in the way.


Turned off easily. I was expecting it to be corroded in, rusted or something. But it popped right off, oozing out the anitfreeze coolant. The word *coolant* is a misnomer. It retains heat after the engine is off and is quite hot on the skin. It hurt. Anyway, I plopped the new one in and tighted it securely.

The car started up which is a good sign. When warm, the engine doesn't always want to start. It will crank, but not always start up. To restore this 22 year old car, I've been updating lots of the wear items, hoping one of them would fix this problem. The fuel pump and fuel pressure regulator were replaced. The vacuum system was replaced. I'm slowly weeding out the potential problems. This sensor tells the computer how to mix the fuel when the car is cold or hot. The symptoms I'm seeing (no start on warm engine, rough idle when cold) all point towards the DME Sensor, but it's another stab in the dark. It can't hurt to replace it though.

The J-Boot Followup

Remember back when the intake had oil in it? I took the intake off for the first time since replacing those pesky air/oil separator seals to check the results. There was still a coating of oil spray in the air sensor, which, to my knowledge, is pretty common in these cars. There was still a little bit of milkshake in the intake. It was certainly nowhere near as much as there was in May. The milkshake is coming from regular short trips in the car, not letting it get up to temperature. I drive 3 miles to work and 3 miles back. With the low oil pressure issues plaguing me, I can't help but to do this routinely. Once the oil pressure is fixed, I will report back on this. The lessened amount of oil in the intake is certainly a good sign though.

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  #15  
Unread 10-01-2008, 05:48 PM
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ExitWound ExitWound is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Pennsylvania
New Milestone reached

Hit the big milestone today. I've put about 1,500 miles on it since getting the car (and fixing the odometer). Let's hope for another 1,500 without incident.

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  #16  
Unread 10-05-2008, 06:35 PM
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ExitWound ExitWound is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Pennsylvania
Power Steering Failure

To my chagrin and dismay, the power steering mount on the 944 collapsed today on the way to the auto parts store.

I figured since the weather was nice, I would change out my transmission fluid. It's a simple procedure that shouldn't have taken too long. Before we ever made it to the auto parts store, I suffered yet another failure.

The single bolt which holds the power steering pump to the engine block either broke loose, or unthreaded itself. At 45mph, I heard a loud thud, and then a clank, clank, ting, tang, maybe even a tung. I thought it was just a rock bouncing its way under the car, perhaps making its way up high on the engine bay. I felt nothing wrong with the riding, handling, or anything and figured it was just that.

Approached the next traffic light and attempted to turn left when I noticed I had no power steering. I knew at that point exactly what had happened. We turned into a parking lot and looked underneath. The power steering belt was dangling beneath the car. How it stayed on was beyond me, but it did. The power steering pump was far lower than it should have been and I knew that I had suffered a mounting failure. From there, the belt came loose, spun free and my power steering was gone.

We went dumpster diving to find some string, or something to act as string, so I could tie up the pump away from the front steering apparati. Packing tape works for such a job! The kind with the string woven throughout the tape is pretty sturdy. Took a few strands and tied the pump back up into its position but did not apply the belt.

I'm without power steering at this point, but to be honest, the car only feels rough when standing still. I've never driven a car without assist and expected worse. At 35mph, steering feels normal and tight. It's only when parking into a lot or turning at a light do I have to accelerate a little bit before attempting the turn.



The parts I've lost are the highlighted ones in this picture. The bolt which holds the pump to the block, a 26mm sleeve fitting, a 13mm sleeve fitting, and the capping bolt. I believe the bolt is a standard 8x38mm bolt that probably can be found at any hardware place. Unfortunately, our local hardware place shut down from pressure from Lowes and Home Depot, both of which do not stock 38mm bolts. Ordering the sleeves from my normal suppliers give me turn around times of *weeks* and *extra charges may apply*. I have a contact from the forums, however, who knows the plight of a failed power steering array and offered to send me parts. Us Porschers stick together!
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  #17  
Unread 10-06-2008, 08:19 PM
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ExitWound ExitWound is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Pennsylvania
Hood Insulation Installed

I purchased the new hood insulation and with some help, had it installed. It fits rather nice, slightly too big on the passenger side. Once stuck, there's no removing it though. Hopefully, this will hinder the progression of the clear coat and paint chipping off the hood.

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  #18  
Unread 10-17-2008, 07:15 PM
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ExitWound ExitWound is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Pennsylvania
Cruise Control Research Begins

I've begun investigating the failure of the cruise control unit. It hasn't worked since I bought the car. During the dashboard replacement, the servo started making noise. Since then, it's been discontinued. I took it apart last night hoping to find something obvious...


It's obvious that it's a simple device actually. The only real fail points, other than the electronics, are the mechanical parts. When the computer controller is activated via the console stalk, it activates the arm to pull the secondary accelerator cable.

The servo has a few gears, a spring, and two swiping arms with two contacts. The contacts sweep up and down the metal rays, presumably creating differing voltage and resistance readings as in the air flow meter. These rails gunk up with grease, dirt, grime, and the contacts themselves get worn. Cleaning them up often fixes any servo-related failures.

I reinstalled the device but have not yet tested it. The other possibilities are a failure of the stalk arm contacts, its grounding circuit, or something a little more sinister like solder points on the computer boards. I'm hoping it's something a little more simple.
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  #19  
Unread 10-20-2008, 09:35 PM
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ExitWound ExitWound is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Pennsylvania
Oil Pressue and Power Steering Problems Updated

I'm looking at low oil pressure (<1bar at normal temp, 4bar cold) if you remember. I had my power steering mounts fail on me due to what I could see as a wobbly power steering pulley.

I took the crank bolt off today and found this had happened to my power steering pulley:


I'm assuming that this isn't by design. I'm assuming this wear is what is creating the wobble in my power steering pulley, consequently putting a cyclical tug-n-ebb of the tension on the power steering belt, ultimately causing hideous vibration in the power steering mounts, destroying my mounting hardware, causing my power steering pump to fall off.

And because this isn't working properly, I'm assuming my oil pressure, due to the failing of this pulley, isn't coming from a properly torqued crank bolt/washer/pulley mount.

Here's the crank bolt:


I reinstalled the crank bolt but left the power steering pulley off to hopefully retrieve the lost pressure. My torque wrench can only measure up to 150ft/lbs (+/- 4ft/lbs). I stuck the car in 5th gear, parking break on, blocked the wheels so that the engine wasn't going to turn. At first, it looked like it was turning with the torquing, but I managed to get at least 150ft/lbs on the bolt. I turned the notch on the wrench to 155 (slightly over its final measurement) and got another click out of it with a few more attempts. I can see inside the top timing belt cover via the air hole at the top (near the cam gear) and confirmed that the engine was turning a little, but not on every torque attempt, therefore the bolt was torquing properly. I don't have a flywheel lock unfortunately.

I put the airbox back on, and the fans, reconnected the battery and took the car around the block. Since I had the car out an hour or two ago it's running slightly warmer than cold, and I have 2bars of pressure. But when I hit the gas and accelerated up the road, the bars jumped quickly to 4, then dropped back down to 2. This isn't related to acceleration pressure, but a significant jump in the needle as if the oil pump might be slipping. It did this twice, then settled back down at 1bar.

At this point, I've attempted four times to retorque the bolt down correctly and each time, the oil pressure is either weak at 4cold/<1hot, or near zero. Its my guess that I'm not properly torquing the bolt down against the oil pump gears, and rather to the crankshaft. This is *probably* due to the pulley being distorted by its wear.

A new pulley is sought and hopefully easily found. I don't want to pay $147 for a new one from Germany.
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  #20  
Unread 03-18-2009, 07:26 PM
rex00111 rex00111 is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2009
Need a little help

I just bought a 1986 944 and I have a really simple question for you. Right beside the battery I found a length of broken vac hose, and the vac canister. Do you know where that vac hose hooks into the system once it goes out from the battery area to the engine compartment??? Great site, thanks for all the detail of your efforts.....
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